Monthly Archives: January 2011

Famine Memory

In re-reading the work of Peter Grey, Niamh Moore and Christopher Morash this weekend, I got to thinking about how Famine memory informs the Irish-American experience (as I can’t speak to how it shapes modern Irish culture directly).  In the novel,  I write of … Continue reading

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Lord Lucan’s Crowbar Brigade

  As pointed out in the novel, Ireland’s loss of 1 million to starvation and disease and up to two million to emigration (out of a population of just over 8 million) is the equivalent of America losing 100 million … Continue reading

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Forced March to Delphi Lodge

Delphi Lodge, County Mayo (now a luxury hotel) On March 30, 1849 (4 years into the Famine), two relief officials (Colonel Hogrove and Captain Primrose) came to the town of Louisburgh in County Mayo to ‘inspect’ (i.e., certify) those receiving outdoor relief (such … Continue reading

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British Troop Strength In Ireland During the Famine

Although exact figures are tough to come by, a conservative estimate of British troop strength during the Famine (not including local constabularies) is 100,000.  (In 1845-46, the British only maintained about 20,000 troops in the Punjab where they were fighting … Continue reading

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The Feast of the Circumcision: For Catholics, an Eighth Day of Creation

In response to a reader’s question, I post the following. New Year’s Day, referred to as the Feast of the Circumcision by Roman Catholics, is a Holy Day of Obligation (a day on which Catholics must attend Mass).  On this … Continue reading

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